Mr Grant’s books for World Book Day 2010

On Thursday 4th March, 2010, World Book Day, we asked teachers to talk to their classes about their favourite books or books they are currently enjoying.  Mr Grant spoke with his classes about a number of books.

The first is Gunter Grass’s ‘The Tin Drum’.   Nielsen Bookdata Online says of the book:

‘The publication of The Tin Drum in 1959 launched Gunter Grass as an author of international repute. Bitter and impassioned, it delivers a scathing dissection of the years from 1925 to 1955 through the eyes of Oskar Matzerath, the dwarf whose manic beating on the toy of his retarded childhood fantastically counterpoints the accumulating horrors of Germany and Poland under the Nazis.’

This was followed by ‘The Wild Things’ by Dave Eggers:

‘Seven-year-old Max likes to make noise, get dirty, ride his bike without a helmet, and howl like a wolf. In any other era, he would be considered a boy. In 2007, he is considered willful and deranged. His home life is problematic. His parents are divorced; his father, immature and romantic, lives in the city. His mother has taken up with a younger man who steals quarters from the change bowl in the foyer. Driven by a series of pressures internal and external, Max leaves home, jumps in a boat and sails across the ocean to a strange island where giant beasts reign – “The Wild Things” from Maurice Sendak’s visionary classic. This is an all-ages adventure, full of wit and soul, that explores the chaos of youth while Max explores the chaos of the world around him.’

Thirdly, Mr Grant talked about Cormac McCarthy’s ‘All The Pretty Horses’:

‘This is Volume One of the “Border Trilogy”.  ‘A uniquely brilliant book …told in language as subtly beautiful as its desert setting. One of the most important pieces of American writing of our time’ – Stephen Amidon, “Sunday Times”. John Grady Cole is the last bewildered survivor of long generations of Texas ranchers. Finding himself cut off from the only life he has ever wanted, he sets out for Mexico with his friend Lacey Rawlins. Befriending a third boy on the way, they find a country beyond their imagining: barren and beautiful, rugged yet cruelly civilized; a place where dreams are paid for in blood. “All the Pretty Horses” is an acknowledged masterpiece and a grand love story: a novel about childhood passing, along with innocence and a vanished American age. Steeped in the wisdom that comes only from loss, it is a magnificent parable of responsibility, revenge and survival.’  Now this is a book that did translate beautifully to the big screen, very atmospheric. Matt Damon, as usual, was amazing in the role of John Grady Cole…  Must read and see…

All quotes are from Nielsen Bookdata Online.

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