Holiday reading (7)

Our seventh post sees a welcome return of the reading of Dr Hundal, another of our lovely biologists, with two titles, again vastly different from each other!  Dr Hundal has sought, this time, to expand his knowledge of another viewpoint of the all-consuming Brexit issue and challenge his own ideas about it with Daniel Hannan‘s book How we invented freedom and why it matters. (Click for a review of the book.)  Dr Hundal says:

“Daniel Hannan is a prominent Eurosceptic and played a key part in the Vote Leave campaign. As someone who is a firm Remainer, I thought it would be a good idea to try and understand the perspective of a Brexiteer.

The book takes a historical look at freedoms, rights and liberty from a very Anglocentric perspective. At times, I found the historical narrative revealing whilst recognising that the perspective is viewed firmly through the lens of ‘English speaking world’.

Nonetheless, Hannan is passionate over his stance and the writing is quite engaging. However, he failed to convince me that Leave is the best option, perhaps, he may persuade you?!”

Clearly, Dr Hundal is still on the Remain side, but it is always good to understand the alternative perspective, if well-written, as opposed to how the issue is portrayed in the popular press!  He is, I feel, more at home with his second choice of book, Sapiens : a brief history of humankind, by Yuval Noah Harari. Of this he writes:

“A sweeping historical account of humankind, taking in 100 000 + years in bite-sized, digestible chapters. The science, coupled to the historical narrative, is very good.

I found the concept of how larger populations, which arose as a result of city-living, required a common, shared value system to maintain order fascinating, particularly with regard to the role of myths and religion as the societal glue.

A great read.”

I’m not sure I am quite ready for Daniel Hannan’s book as yet, but at some point I may give it a go.  I think Yuval Noah Harari’s might be quite the thing… What do you think?  it would be good to hear from those who have read either or both of these titles, let’s keep the debate going!

Life On Air (David Attenborough)

On Thursday 4th March, 2010, World Book Day, we asked teachers to talk to their classes about their favourite books or books they are currently enjoying.   Mrs Jennings talked with her Year 11 and Year 13 students about Sir David Attenborough’s autobiography and the influence he has had in the way the general public view biology and wildlife.   She says:  “He is a very interesting man and has had an adventurous youth so the book makes fascinating reading.”

Attenborough is Britain’s best-known natural history film-maker. His career as a naturalist and broadcaster has spanned nearly five decades and there are very few places on the globe that he has not visited. In this volume of memoirs David tells stories of the people and animals he has met and the places that he has visited and the jobs he has had after leaving Cambridge University in the early 1950s to date.  His films make everything clear and are enjoyed by so many of all ages and, as a result, his book must be a delight.