Christmas reading at Berkhamsted (3)

Part three of the Christmas reading project features a selection from Mrs Kelly, one of my fellow librarians, of novels which she read during the holidays.  She read two of these in translation in her native Polish, despite being fluent in English!  The first, however, was originally written and read in English.  It’s Matthew Thomas’s novel entitled We are not ourselves:

“[This is] a very compelling novel of a family (Irish emigrants in America) dealing with challenging circumstances. A very intimate portrait of a daughter, wife, mother, nurse, alcoholic. Interestingly, written by a man!”

The author appears to have put so much into the consideration of his characters, which is appealing to a reader… One more for my list!  The next on Mrs Kelly’s, is Yann Martel‘s first novel, Self.  She says:

” [This was] interesting but [I] had some mixed feelings.  A fictional auto-biography of a Canadian-born traveller and writer. Initially, rather funny, but I was disappointed with the way the gender issues were portrayed. Definitely an adult content.”

It is always good to have some topical issues to discuss, perhaps this one should be on our reading group list.  Her final choice is Rakesh Satyal’s Blue Boy:

“A lovely story about a boy, who certainly is a bit of an outcast amongst his male peers – loves pink, girls’ toys and secretly uses mum’s make up. A novel about searching for an answer to the question: Who am I? And it is all in the colourful Indian world.”

These Christmas posts are manifesting some very different types of stories and show the versatility of a reading mind.  I like the fact that they are not all new books, just released as well, showing the enduring nature of reading as a pastime. Contact us with your views…

 

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Author: Berkhamsted School Library

Main aims for Berkhamsted School Library • to provide a central resource for the whole school curriculum • to encourage an ethos of enquiry and discovery • to assist pupils in becoming confident and independent learners • to develop research and information skills throughout the school • to offer resources which enrich cultural values and experiences for pupils, as well as have a role in their recreational life and promote reading for pleasure as a lifelong activity

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