World Book Day : celebrations in school, part 2

Welcome to part 2 of our World Book Day celebrations posts.  Today we are focusing on recommendations from our Economics Department here at Berkhamsted School and not one economics- or business-related title amongst them!

They all look like fascinating books and include three great fiction reads, an autobiography, a history book and an inspirational book helping us to rethink how to be successful…  Take your pick from this list:

1.   Mr Cowie has suggested Vanished kingdoms : the history of half-forgotten Europe by Norman Davies.

This sounds like a truly fascinating book about Europe’s lost realms.  Who knows what happened to the lost Empire of Aragon or the kingdoms of Burgundy?  The author also considers which

current nations could disappear or become a distant memory in the future…  An alternative historical read for you…

2.   In the withaak’s shade by Herman Charles Bosman was Mr Pain’s choice.  This book tells the story of a farmer, Oom Schalk, who goes out to the bushveld to look for his cattle.  He decides to rest beneath the withaak tree and look out from his seated position there for his cattle.  While he is at rest, a leopard approaches, sniffs at him and then lies down and goes to sleep at his side!  When he tries to tell others about his experience later, unsurprisingly he is not believed.  I would like to read this story myself…

3.   Mr Fung shared his book of the moment with his classes and this was Bear Grylls‘s autobiography, Mud, Sweat and Tears.  Grylls tells of his early life when his father taught him to sail and love the outdoor life and how he was later inspired to take up the most strenuous of challenges that a human can put him/herself through.  He describes how an horrific accident which led to his back being broken in three places nearly paralysed him, threatening  the achievement of the most basic of  functions, let alone continuing to pursue adventures and explore the natural world…

4.   Mr Foster’s offering is Catch 22 by Joseph Heller.  A satirical indictment of military madness and stupidity, and the desire of the ordinary man to survive it is how one reviewer on Nielsen Bookdata Online  describes this novel.  Although I haven’t yet read the book myself, I feel that it is one that I must.  Captain Yossarian is a bombardier in the Army Air Forces whose job is to bomb enemy positions in Italy and France, he turns his mission into one of survival.

5.  Mr Medaris has recommended two titles to his students this year.  The first, Every man dies alone by Hans Fallada, is a fictional story based on the true to life experiences of a husband and his wife, who, acting alone, became part of the German Resistance by writing postcards describing the appalling activities of  the Nazi-led German Government during the Second World War.  The story tells how the couple were eventually discovered, denounced, arrested, tried and executed.  This book was one of the first anti-Nazi German novels to be published after the end of the war, the author dying not long after its completion, prior to the date of publication.  I feel that this is an important book of the mid-twentieth century, another to add to the ever-growing list of books to read…

Mr Medaris’s second choice is Geoff Colvin‘s text Talent is overrated :  What Really Separates World-Class Performers from Everybody Else.  This text provides an argument that talent alone is not enough to be really successful, one needs to understand the concept of deliberate practice.  Colvin maintains that if you take this route, with dedicated practice and perseverance which is honed over time, you will be following in the footsteps of world-renowned successful people such as Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Winston Churchill and Tiger Woods, to name but three.  Read the book to glean so much more!

vanishedkingdoms inthewithaak mudsweatandtears catch22 everyman talentisoverrated

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Author: Berkhamsted School Library

Main aims for Berkhamsted School Library • to provide a central resource for the whole school curriculum • to encourage an ethos of enquiry and discovery • to assist pupils in becoming confident and independent learners • to develop research and information skills throughout the school • to offer resources which enrich cultural values and experiences for pupils, as well as have a role in their recreational life and promote reading for pleasure as a lifelong activity

2 thoughts on “World Book Day : celebrations in school, part 2”

  1. I’m now not certain where you are getting your info, but great topic. I must spend a while finding out much more or understanding more. Thanks for wonderful info I was searching for this information for my mission.

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