Ms Best’s books for World Book Day 2010

On Thursday 4th March, 2010, World Book Day, we asked teachers to talk to their classes about their favourite books or books they are currently enjoying.  Ms Best talked with her students about Scandinavian books and authors she’d read when she lived in Norway.  The first book mentioned below is one that she has actually read in Norwegian (I am very impressed!):

‘Grainy CCTV footage shows a man walking into a bank and putting a gun to a cashier’s head. He tells her to count to twenty-five. When he doesn’t get his money in time, she is executed. Detective Harry Hole is assigned to the case. While Harry’s girlfriend is away in Russia, an old flame gets in touch. He goes to dinner at her house and wakes up at home with no memory of the past twelve hours. The same morning the girl is found shot dead in her bed. Then Harry begins to receive threatening e-mails. Is someone trying to frame him for this unexplained death? Meanwhile the bank robberies continue with unparalleled savagery. Gripping and surprising, “Nemesis” is a thriller by one of the biggest stars of Scandinavian crime fiction.’   Nielsen Bookdata Online

Next comes a book by Swedish author Henning Mankell, whom many of us know through the recent BBC tv adaptation of his Wallander stories:

‘In woodland outside Ystad, the police make a horrific discovery: a severed head, and hands locked together in an attitude of prayer. A Bible lies at the victim’s side, the pages marked with scribbled corrections. A string of macabre incidents, including attacks on domestic animals, have been taking place, and Inspector Wallander fears that these disturbances could be the prelude to attacks on humans on an even more alarming scale. Linda Wallander, in preparation to join the police force, arrives at Ystad. Exhibiting some of the hallmarks of her father – the maverick approach, the flaring temper – she becomes entangled in a case involving a group of religious extremists who are bent on punishing the world’s sinners. Following on from the enormous success of the Kurt Wallander mysteries, Henning Mankell has begun an outstanding new chapter in crime writing.’

Her third is a book by Icelandic novelist Yrsa Sigurdardottir – ‘ Last Rituals’:

‘A young man is found brutally murdered, his eyes gouged out. A student of Icelandic history in Reykjavik, he came from a wealthy German family who do not share the police’s belief that his drug dealer murdered him. Attorney Thora Gudmundsdottir is commissioned by his family to find out the truth, with the help — and hindrance — of boorish ex-policeman Matthew Reich. Their investigations into his research take them deep into a grisly world of torture and witchcraft both past and present, as they draw ever closer to a killer gripped by a dangerous obsession…’Exhilarating…matches Tess Gerritsen and Kathy Reichs in the bloodchiller stakes.’ — Waterstone’s Books Quarterly ‘Given the dark subject matter, this is a surprisingly funny book…a quirky and interesting read.’–Guardian’

And finally she recommends ‘The Fourth man’ by Norwegian Kjell Ola Dahl:

‘In the course of a routine police raid Detective Inspector Frank Frolich of the Oslo Police saves Elizabeth Faremo from getting inadvertently caught in crossfire. By the time he learns that she is the sister of Jonny Faremo, wanted member of a larceny gang, it is already too late – he is obsessed. Suspected, suspended and blindly in love, Frolich must find out if he is being used before his life unravels beyond repair. ‘

A more diverse selection for all  fans of crime and mystery, try and leave comments here…

All quotes and synopses are taken from Nielsen Bookdata Online.

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Author: Berkhamsted School Library

Main aims for Berkhamsted School Library • to provide a central resource for the whole school curriculum • to encourage an ethos of enquiry and discovery • to assist pupils in becoming confident and independent learners • to develop research and information skills throughout the school • to offer resources which enrich cultural values and experiences for pupils, as well as have a role in their recreational life and promote reading for pleasure as a lifelong activity

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