The Staff Book Club enjoys the first meeting of term…

We had our first meeting of the term yesterday and, since we were lucky enough to receive ten copies of The Chilbury ladies’ choir by Jennifer Ryan, together with a bottle of Plymouth gin, angostura bitters, oat butter cookies, and bunting, balloons and messerschmidt aeroplanes from HarperCollins to decorate, we had a party!   We held the party in the Chapel at our King’s Road campus…

Chilbury party

Generally, members of the club enjoyed the book, saying it was a relaxing read: humorous, warm, and a little bit shocking, but then we remembered that Chilbury was right in the firing line from Hitler’s air force, times were desperate and really quite awful, especially when the bomb landed. A couple of members didn’t like the novel and felt it was unrealistic in terms of the events described, and attitudes of the characters.  They believed it to be too saccharine at times and felt that we had lost sight of the choir by the end.  They also felt that the ending was predictable.

This being said, we liked the idea of the story being told in diary, journal and letter entries, and felt that this was an effective way to get across multiple versions of the events, getting a full picture of how each individual saw how the story unfolded.  Telling a story in this way somehow seems to make it feel that we are more intimately involved in it by reading the personal writings of an individual.

We felt that the midwife, Edwina Paltrey, should never be forgiven for her actions, being the cold-hearted, calculating creature that she was.  However harsh her background, and despite the forgiveness she was seeking from her sister by trying to make things right between them, her actions were completely reprehensible!

Elements of the story described rather accurately the class system and attitude towards women which persisted at the time, with particular reference to the Brigadier and his treatment of his daughters and wife.

Some members felt that more could have been made of the choir, and felt that more could have been made of its importance after Hattie and Prim died, but the overwhelming feeling that making the music was a joyous act, unifying all those women, and strengthening their resolve to get through the war in a supportive and caring environment.  One also felt that they had gained in confidence themselves.

Read this novel if you like stories such as Call the midwife…

chilbury

 

 

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Train delays, traffic jams and family: reasons to be cheerful

Some excellent reading, we are excited about promoting the shortlisted books in our libraries!

CILIP Carnegie & Kate Greenaway

Jenny Hawke is the CKG judge for YLG South East and is the Library Supervisor at Petts Wood Library, Kent.

Jenny Hawke.jpg

I don’t have a very long commute to work, a short bus ride and then a short train journey. Nonetheless, along with all the other passengers on the train, when we heard the driver telling us we were held up at a red signal, I used to groan and sigh thinking about all I had to do at work and the day I had got planned slowly disappearing as I realised I would be late. However, once I became a Carnegie and Kate Greenaway judge last autumn all this changed. Train delays were a joy as it meant I could read an extra page, or maybe two, and if I was really lucky and the delay was going to be a long one, a whole chapter. When you are faced…

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Lent term newsletter

This term we have been busy, as ever, in our libraries, so for a little extra news about what we’ve been up to, please click on the link below to retrieve our end of term newsletter:

Lent 2017

 

Berkhamsted School Staff Book Club

We held our first meeting of the year this week!   Yes, I know, we’re approaching the end of March already but, here in Berkhamsted, life has simply been too busy for everyone to meet, indeed, this meeting was postponed and rearranged three times!

We had an animated and very enjoyable meeting, nevertheless, despite the fact that we were still a couple of members short.  We discussed Jacqueline Woodson‘s novel Another Brooklyn, published by Oneworld Publications and other books which we have recently enjoyed reading.

We all had differing views about Another Brooklyn, and came to the meeting feeling that we either liked or disliked it.  The discussion was interesting because we shared initial thoughts, then answered the questions which the book’s publisher had sent, and, through discussion, some of us changed the way we had thought about the book and saw it in a new light (or aspects of it at least!).  The story tells of a woman who, at the beginning of the novel, is present at the funeral of her father, and is catching up with her brother and his news, after spending time abroad as part of her job and looking after their father before he died.  After bidding goodbye to her brother, she encounters another woman on the train with whom she, and two others, had shared a particularly close friendship during their adolescence.  This group of four girls gradually disintegrated as the girls grew up and apart, seeking different dreams from each other.  The story is told in the form of a prose poem, and as such, is lyrical in tone, and is set in the mid to late 1970s in the then dangerous world of Brooklyn.  It covers the themes of memory, death, religion and race as well as the concept of close friendship. We ended the meeting less divided in opinion than at the beginning, but remained in one camp or the other, some liked it and others didn’t! I did…

another brooklyn

Recommended reading from the group includes the following books this month:

  • A death in Tuscany by Michele Giuttari
  • Catilina’s riddle by Stephen Saylor
  • The last of the great storytellers : tales from the heart of Morocco by Richard Hamilton
  • The breakdown by B A Paris
  • Quiet : the power of introverts in a world that can’t stop talking by Susan Cain
  • In the unlikely event by Judy Blume
  • My husband next door by Catherine Alliott
  • The return by Victoria Hislop
  • The thread by Victoria Hislop
  • All the bright places by Jennifer Niven
  • The marrying of Chani Kaufman by Eve Harris
  • The other half of my heart by Stephanie Butland
  • A nun’s story by Sister Agatha
  • Nice cup of tea and a sit down (Nicey and Wifey)
  • Mrs Poe by Lynne Cullen
  • My sweet revenge by Jane Fallon
  • Pushing perfect by Michelle Falkoff
  • A secret garden by Katie Fforde

This list demonstrates a wide and varied selection of reading tastes.  If you have read any of the titles on here, please do get in touch and let me know what you think.

Read of the Week: The End of The Affair by Graham Greene

A marvellous novel – also enjoyed by some members of our book club, and which engendered animated discussion!

The Reader Online

GG-2_grandeThis week’s Read comes recommended by our Schools Coordinator Natalie who has chosen Graham Greene’s The End of the Affair.

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Drop Everything And Read

Another part of our #worldbookday adventures included DEAR Drop Everything And Read. This initiative involved our teachers spending a few minutes at the beginning or end of lessons talking to their classes about reading and literature, and specifically their own favourites, whether from their childhood or adult days.  We have had some lovely feedback, which I give below:

Mrs Livingston

I chatted with my Year 9 boys and girls about their favourite books – both current and from childhood. [They shared] lots of lovely memories of family members reading certain stories to them, hence why they have remained with them as firm favourites.  I brought in The tiger who came to tea by Judith Kerr as I remember it being read to me as a child and I now read it to my boys.  I took my eldest to see a theatre production of it in London last summer and he was engrossed!  It was his first experience of the theatre and to have a favourite story re-told on stage was lovely to watch.

Mrs M Murray

I have to tell you that I had a letter back from a famous author!  Andrew Martin wrote back to me this week after I had sent him a letter saying how much I enjoyed his book Belles and whistlesI have suggested to the children that they could write fan letters to their favourite authors…

Mr Cruickshanks

I did try to convince my Year 10 boys of the wonders of Bernard Cornwell‘s historical novels, especially The last kingdom series  (as televised by the BBC!).  I tried to sell them on the idea that it was like Game of thrones, only based a little more closely on the real world.  They didn’t seem particularly impressed, but at least I gave it a go!! I happen to know of a year 8 boy who is working his way through these and loving them! (librarian)

Mrs Leonard

I certainly did advertise one of my favourites (A town like Alice – Nevil Shute) to all classes, selling it as one of the books with an excellent strong female lead!  I had the book cover and a synopsis on the board and told them I first read it when I was in Year 8 so it could appeal to them.  Lots of them took phones out and photographed the board so hopefully it might catch on!  For Year 13 French students, I recommended Paris by Edward Rutherfurd as a great fiction/history mixture charting the history of Paris from 0AD to present day with historical accuracy but through fictional characters.  He has also written similar tomes on New York, London and so forth. It was lovely to be able to talk about books together and prompted some good discussions in French and Spanish about favourite books and why.

I send many thanks to my teaching colleagues for these reports – and will try to chase up a few more…

 

World Book Day 2017 at Berkhamsted

wbd reading teachers board castle

We had a lot of fun last Thursday, 2nd March, when celebrating World Book Day!  In our libraries, we put up a display such as this one showing teachers and librarians reading on one side of each picture and then on the other side, we were holding up the books which are currently grabbing our attention.  The displays attracted many visitors as they passed through, on their way to their study tables and computers!

We also welcomed classes into the libraries where they played two reading games and were asked to complete cards telling us what they like to read, which are their favourite books and what they are reading at the moment (their ‘Writes of Passage’, if you will, which we are still taking cards for).

The first game we played was called ‘Crossed Lines’ and was taken from the National Literacy Trust’s website.  We chose a few first lines from really good novels we found in the libraries and then started off a chain of Chinese whispers, loved by boys and girls alike.  We used Charles Kingsley’s The water babies, Patrick Ness’s A monster calls, David Almond’s A song for Ella Grey and Meg Rosoff’s Picture me gone at the girls’ school which worked really well. The titles we read from at the boys’ school were The curious incident of the dog in the night-time (Mark Haddon); Peter Pan (J M Barrie); Stormbreaker (Anthony Horowitz) and To kill a mockingbird (Harper Lee).  This was a sure-fire way to demonstrate how stories evolve with the telling, and how to listen properly!  We enjoyed watching the children’s faces as they were trying to understand how to pass on a simple sentence.

Our second game was ‘Reading Chairs’, the idea for which, again , was borrowed from the National Literacy Trust’s website.  This time we took the children back to the party games from their younger days and played what, in its previous incarnation, was know as musical chairs!  A librarian or teacher read from the beginning of a book and each time he or she stopped reading, a chair was removed from the library.  Whilst everyone was rather competitive, we did manage to maintain a sense of decorum!  The winners received a creme egg…

A good day was had by all, indeed, we carried on the next day since we’d enjoyed it so much!

 

Featured Poem: Who Ever Loved That Loved Not at First Sight by Christopher Marlowe

How lovely. It’s time to delve deeper into poetry, methinks…

The Reader Online

creamThis week’s Featured Poem returns to the theme of love and fate with Christopher Marlowe’s Who Ever Loved That Loved Not at First Sight?

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The Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction Longlist 2017

So our to-be-read piles are rapidly increasing in height!

Savidge Reads

It has not long struck midnight, and whilst many of you (myself included) may be asleep, the book world still keeps whizzing with the latest news that the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction longlist has been announced and it came with a surprise or four. It had been said that the longlist was going to be twelve books, yet the wealth of women’s writing was so strong in the last twelve months (as I mentioned when I tried to guess the longlist last week) that we have a list of sixteen titles. And here they are…

  • Stay With Me – Ayọ̀bámi Adébáyọ̀̀ (Canongate, Nigerian, 1st Novel)
  • The Power – Naomi Alderman (Viking, British, 4th Novel)
  • Hag-Seed – Margaret Atwood (Hogarth, Canadian, 16th Novel)
  • Little Deaths – Emma Flint (Picador, British, 1st Novel)
  • The Mare – Mary Gaitskill (Serpent’s Tail, American, 3rd Novel)
  • The Dark Circle – Linda Grant (Virago, British…

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Featured Poem: Song by Rupert Brooke

A beautiful poem for coming out of winter, but also reflective of where Brooke was, this time one hundred years ago…

The Reader Online

chocolateThis week’s poem is simply called Song and comes from poet Rupert Brooke, renowned for his war sonnets.

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